Friday, April 25, 2014

Question Of The Month: The Stories From Your Life Edition

This month, we posed the following question to the Superromance authors: 
 Can you share with us something from one of your books that was based on something that actually happened to you?

Laura Drake: My first Super, Her Road Home, begins with a biker-chick wrecking her bike (and her collarbone) in an accident on rain-slicked roads. But that scene was written originally as a close call where she almost hits a stray dog. THAT did happen to me!  I've ridden 100,000 miles on the back of my husband's bike, and the same number on my own. I've got enough true stories to fuel 100 books!

Jennifer Lohmann:  I'm sure there are lots of things in my books that are from an actual experience of mine, but the one that comes to mind is in Reservations for Two. While wandering the Taste of Chicago with my roommates in college, we happened upon an aerial dance troupe like described in that scene. It was such a magical moment for me and seemed so perfect for the summer, the festival, the food--all of it.

Vicki Essex: There's a particular scene in my second Superromance, Back to the Good Fortune Diner, that involves an inside out T-shirt. That came directly out of my own hilariously humiliating experience when, while my mother was chewing me out for coming home late, her tirade was cut short as she noticed my disheveled state of dress. It seemed she'd gathered the reason for my tardiness from that and decided not to probe further. 

Kris Fletcher: There's a running joke in my July release, Dating a Single Dad, involving two brothers and a long-ago burnt Pop Tart. Of course this came straight from the time in my own childhood when my brother adjusted the setting on our toaster so my Pop Tart - the last one in the the house, people! - was burned beyond consumption. He swears it was an accident. I know better. Not that I'm bitter or anything ...

Pamela Hearon: I draw from my own experiences often when I'm writing.--especially using places I've been as the setting (ie. the cave in OUT OF THE DEPTHS, the summer camp in THE SUMMER PLACE, the Parisian flat in MOONLIGHT IN PARIS).  But the book I'm currently writing has a subplot  drawn straight from first-hand experience.  It involves a couple (based on my husband and I) who strive to get back the life they've always known after he is diagnosed with heart disease and undergoes open-heart surgery.  It's easy to get too caught up in the emotions, so sometimes I have to move to another scene and then come back to the one I was working on.  But I also think it's good therapy to write about the bad things that have happened.  It lets the emotions out and allows me to view them from a distance.

Tara Taylor Quinn: In my case, it’s more like what happens after I write a book.  Too many times I’ve written about something and then it happens.  To the point that my daughter told me once never to write about her!  The one that stands out most isn’t funny.  Yet it helped me deal with a tough situation.  I was writing a novella at the request of Harlequin.  They told me only that the heroine had to have a late in life pregnancy.  It was for a Mother’s Day anthology.  I started researching, began the writing process, and got a call from my brother that he and his wife – both in their forties – were expecting.  They’d taken measures to not have any more children.  In my research I discovered that in later in life pregnancies women are much more likely to have a baby with Down Syndrome.  It has to do with the way the eggs break down. Shortly after I’d finished the first draft of my story, I had another call from my brother.  They’d had an ultrasound done and from the measurements of the fetus arms and legs, the doctor suspected Down Syndrome.  From my research I knew that if we had a Down Syndrome baby, we would be very lucky as people with Down Syndrome have one characteristic that tends to be across the board – perennial joy.  Our dynamo filled with joy is turning nine this year and he is truly a blessing in all of our lives.

Now readers, tell us - if you were writing a book, what incident from your life would you want to include? 

6 comments:

Mary Preston said...

These were fun to read through thank you. I think I would have to include the travelling we did when I was a child. Even with a map we ended up going all over the place with my Mother as navigator. She used to say: "We are not lost, just taking a little side trip."

kris said...

LOL, Mary. That's the spirit!

Sonya said...

I love when authors draw from their real life experiences. :) I especially love knowing those things about books I've read.

I was just thinking about some of the weird things that have happened to me. One was one of the times I was in Russia and our building was stormed by a group of men with machine guns (that’s Putin’s freedom for you!). Another time I was working in London and witnessed major crime.

I think I should just stay home…

Sonya said...

Whoops - *A* major crime...

kris said...

Sonya, you HAVE to put those episodes in a story!!!

penney said...

If I was writing a book I would have a walk through the forest. I love walking out in the woods it makes me feel at piece there.
Penney

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