Tuesday, April 17, 2012

About That Spring Fever...


Rogenna Brewer mentioned that she had spring fever. Me, too. For me it manifests in the compulsion to get outside and work in my garden. Because of living overseas for 6 of the nearly 9 previous years, I haven't had much to work with...containers with annuals, herbs, some roses in our lovely Belgian garden (we'd call it a walled yard, they call it a jardin). So it's great to be back home in the USA in the house we bought 9 months ago with the high hopes of not moving again for many, many years. Did I emphasize no more moves for a good while?
Even though the home we bought is relatively new, it's 9 yrs old but with no landscaping. This is good and bad. Let's focus on the good. I get to put in my flower beds and trees wherever I wish. On Saturday I decided it was time to start. But I'm afraid of digging into our dog's electric fence, so I kept this one next to the house. It's in a spot that if I mess it up it won't matter as much as say, the front yard.
You can see my handiwork in the photo. It seemed simple. Dig up a 10' by 10' (3mx3m) area. Just lift up the sod. How hard could it be? And I decided to make it kind of heart-shaped. Easy, right? All I can say is that if not for the great workouts I've been putting in at the gym in cross-fit and cardio-fit classes, I wouldn't have made it. The unseasonably warm day had sweat dripping down my face within minutes. I kept telling myself I was working off all of the Easter Bunnies I ate last weekend.
Now, the fun part. I get to pick up some dirt, mulch, and plants. Probably a weeping mini cherry tree is in the lot. Of course, as a romance writer I am brilliant. I conveniently had a cortisone shot to the shoulder yesterday (planned before the sod busting) and I'll have to rely on dearest hubby and teen daughter to bring in the dirt and mulch. Tee hee.
What are your best gardening tips?

14 comments:

Sonya said...

I think I’m allergic to gardening. Any garden is better if I say well away from it!
It’s more than halfway through autumn here, so there’s not a lot of spring fever going on!

Lola said...

Look around in your neighborhood and see what thrives and doesn't thrive. Keep note of what looks best during fall, spring, summer, winter. And keep an eye out for plants that serve double duty - their are food plants that make excellent ornamental plants.

Alison said...

I love cherry trees, and indeed all blossom. When we were little we used to pick up armfuls of it and throw it up in the air to pretend it was snow.

Melanie Rose Meadors said...

We try to always include lots of native plants in our gardens. Not only do they grow well, since they are naturally from your area, but they are good for the wildlife, too (birds, bees, etc). And we try to avoid anything that says "invasive" or any synonyms of that word--those plants tend to spread EVERYWHERE, and you end up hating them worse than weeds! Good luck with your gardening!

Kate said...

This is my first spring without a garden. I felt a little lost not being able to visit my old 'friends' to see who survived and who didn't. I envy you! We're not ready to start our gardens yet, and I suspect when we do, they'll be considerably smaller than our old ones.

For a gardening tip, it's a good idea to know what zone you live in. Here on the east coast of Canada, I'm in 4b-5. Often the tags on plants will tell you what zone they'll thrive in, and if not, the garden centre folks should know.
Have fun!

Anonymous said...

Tips? Don't really have any since I stopped planting flowers because the squirrels wouldn't stay out of the planters!


MarcieR

Mary Brady said...

Geri, my best gardening tip is Just Do It

Seed and plant used to languish in pouch and pot. I have a pact with myself. If I buy bulbs they must go into the ground that day. If I buy plants, they must go in before I buy any more plants of any kind. Seeds, well, I don't get the expensive ones, I can plant lettuce and spinach in the fall and seeds often grow the next year.

Happy gardening. We'll expect pictures later of what you bought and planted.

Kathy Altman said...

Geri, a heart-shaped flowerbed is a brilliant idea! And yes, you are very clever for inadvertently recruiting help. ;-) One tip I've found handy is to make sure you wear gloves when planting--the squirrels and raccoons can smell your scent on the bulbs and they dig them up for midnight snacks. Ours do, anyway, the little beasts. Best wishes with your planting! :-)

mary sullivan said...

Geri, I have to agree with all of the popular wisdom in everyone's comments--plant flowers that will thrive in your zone.

Another thing: if you don't have a compost bin, or haven't built up enough compost to use in this year's garden, a lot of counties and towns are now giving away compost every spring--made from the green waste they've collected throughout the year--which I think is a fabulous idea!

Tammy Yenalavitch said...

My best tip is to hire someone to do the gardening. I hate it.

Beth Andrews said...

Geri, I'm not much of a gardener, though I do try. This year my older daughter wants to try her hand at composting and a bigger vegetable garden. We'll see how that goes. Luckily, my husband is a fantastic gardener and keeps our yard and flowers looking wonderful :-)

Rogenna Brewer said...

I'm planning a vegtable garden this year. We have the prefect spot at the foot of the hill. But my husband's been "planning" to build a shed there for the past--oh, I forget how many years.

So his plans have always cancelled out my garden.

This year I out smarted him. Or as my youngest said, it took you 25 years to figure out how to ask dad a question.

First I asked if he planned to build his shed "this year." He said, no. So then I said, I'd like put in that garden.

What could he say?

He either had to go out there and build ithe darn thing, or let me put in a garden wall.

He's probably relieved.

FYI, I had a cortisone shot to the knee last week. Youngest son will be building that wall.

marybelle said...

I don't know that I have a best gardening tip, except to ask my Father. He could grow on concrete.

Snookie said...

My husband does all the gardening. He's a horticulturalist! My advice would be to take the advice that has been given. Especially the advice on seeing what's growing in your neighborhood and being on the watch for invasives.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...